No, the 25th Amendment Isn’t the Way to Boot Trump

found online by Raymond

 
From Jonathan Bernstein:

Donald Trump has amply demonstrated he is not fit for the office he holds. But it would be a grave mistake to use the mechanism of the 25th Amendment to get rid of him, as a wide group of liberals have urged for a while, now joined by conservatives such as Ross Douthat.

Sorry, Congress: If you believe Trump needs to go, you’re going to have to do it yourselves.

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Leaking From the Top

found online by Raymond

 
From Cato Institute: Julian Sanchez:

On Monday, the Washington Post dropped a bombshell, reporting that Donald Trump had shared highly classified “codeword” intelligence—provided by an ally on the condition that it not be more widely disseminated—with Russian officials during their meeting last week. While administration officials initially issued fierce denials, national security advisor H.R. McMaster, who had himself blasted the story as “false” in a carefully-worded statement, effectively confirmed the key elements of the report at a press briefing Tuesday morning. While McMaster repeatedly insisted that Trump’s decision to share information had been “wholly appropriate,” his remarks (perhaps inadvertently) raised several additional grounds for concern.

First, let’s dispense with the obvious: Classification authority in the United States flows from the president, and so a president is legally entitled to declassify or disclose information as he sees fit, for any reason or no reason at all. This is a case where that infamous Nixonism—”When the president does it, that means it is not illegal”—actually applies. Nobody, as far as I can tell, is seriously disputing that. It’s also true that presidents often choose, for strategic or diplomatic reasons, to share particular pieces of intelligence with foreign governments. Yet this does not appear to have been a “routine” instance of such sharing, as McMaster sought to characterize it—not by a longshot.

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Bending the Arc of the Universe

found online by Raymond

 
From North Carolina pastor John Pavlovitz:

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

In 1871, Unitarian minister Theodore Parker first spoke these words in opposition to slavery here in America.

In 1958 Dr Martin Luther King Jr. repeated them to a nation still fighting for equality for all its people.

In this day of uncertainty and grief, these words desperately need to be repeated again, though not as solace for weary spectators—but as battle cry for warriors.

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An Impeachment Dilemma for Republicans

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Raymond: Could have hidden impact
 
From Infidel753:

So far, talk of impeaching Trump has been just talk. Republicans hold majorities in both the House and the Senate, so Democrats would need the cooperation of at least some Republicans to impeach and remove him. And so far, few or no Republicans in Congress seem to be even considering cooperating with such a move, despite the rich abundance of grounds for doing so. But there’s another aspect of the issue that they ought to be thinking about.

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They Might as Well Learn Right Away

found online by Raymond

 
From Wisconsin conservative James Wigderson:

I have a simple rule: I criticize politicians when they’re wrong, and I praise them when they’re right. That applies regardless of party, regardless of personalities, and it also applies regardless of experience.

If you don’t correct a puppy when you’re potty training them, you’re going to have a lot of “accidents” in the house. It’s the same with politicians.

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Oh, So All Of A Sudden I’m Not Good Enough For You Anymore?

found online by Raymond

 
From The Onion:

So this is it? You’re just leaving? After everything we’ve been through, after everything we’ve shared, you’re just going to walk out of here as if it all meant nothing. I can’t believe you can stand there and tell me it’s over. How can you suddenly say I’m not good enough for you, just because I’ve been distant and emotionally abusive for the past several years?

I don’t even understand where this is coming from. I’ve been nothing but cold and unsupportive, and now, out of nowhere, you say you’re done with me.

Tell me, what’s changed?

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The Morning Summary

found online by Raymond

 
From tengrain at Mock Paper Scissors:

Cannot hardly wait to see what secrets Trump will tell Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the king of Jordan, when they visit the White House today! I’m sure they are wondering which of their security assets he revealed to the Russians, too/also, as their countries have long been allies of the US and probably have been sharing intelligence with us for years.

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Those Rocks Belong to Everyone

found online by Raymond

 
From PZ Myers:

If you’ve ever been to a national park (or to most state parks), there are strict restrictions on what you are allowed to do as a visitor: you can’t back a pickup truck in and load it up with petrified wood, or an assortment of cactuses, or harvest a crop of squirrels. There are all kinds of rules to protect the status of the park from predatory hordes of visitors — if you go rafting through the Grand Canyon, for instance, get used to pooping into a can because you have to haul out everything you bring in.

This is true for everyone. You don’t get to say “Back off, man, I’m a scientist” to excuse going at the Grand Canyon walls with a rock hammer. You have to get a scientific collecting permit, and it’s no rubber stamp process — your application actually gets reviewed by qualified peers.

You know what’s even less effective? Saying Back off, man, I’m a creation scientist.

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Uh Oh. Muslim Ban Judges Asking Obvious Questions

found online by Raymond

 
From Frances Langum:

DOJ Lawyer Jeffrey Wall does his best, referring to a third party brief (!?) to explain that Trump has “clarified” his campaign statements.

But the judges noted that the “Muslim ban” stuff didn’t come down off of the Trump campaign website until when? May 8?! And they were not, as great legal minds would put it, “impressed.”

A second judge on the panel mentioned “Koramatsu,” the case that upheld the inhumane detention of Japanese citizens during World War II, and that is now universally condemned as a bad case.

Uh oh.

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